Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

Views
2 years ago

A balanced diet

  • Text
  • Nutritional
  • Balanced
  • Menus
  • Ingredients
  • Methods
  • Investigate
  • Disorders
  • Involves
  • Analytical
  • Biology
This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

Click to edit project

Click to edit project description

Page 1 of 2 A balanced diet The aim of this project is to design a menu for somebody with a nutritional disorder. The project is split into two main sections. The first is very much research-based, finding out about a nutritional disorder. The second involves analytical chemistry and biology, as you will conduct food tests. Finally, you will collate the information and data you have collected and suggest two menus for two days for somebody with a nutritional disorder. Getting Started First things first, you should carry out some research into a nutritional disorder of your choosing. Some examples to choose from include: • Diabetes • Coeliac disease • Crohn’s disease • High blood pressure • Anaemia You should produce a promotional poster or leaflet telling people about the condition. You should include information about diagnosis, symptoms, recommendations for treatment (including modification to diet) and which people are most likely affected. Create the poster/leaflet for the target audience. Menu design: Your second task is to produce two menus for two days. Each day should include three meals - breakfast, lunch and dinner - as well as drinks and any snack breaks you feel appropriate. The first menu should be for an average working day - either at work or at school/college. The second should be for the weekend. Each menu should be designed to meet the sufferer’s total recommended daily allowance (RDA) for major food types. Instructions should also be given about how to make the food on the menu and when they should make the food - for example, they may need to take lunch to work with them. You should also include any specific ways foods should be cooked, or specific ingredients that should be used - for example, low fat, low salt etc. Click to edit project description Testing food: A lot of the ingredients you use will have information on the packaging. This, in most cases, should tell you all you need to know about its nutritional value. However, for this project you should also carry out your own food tests to check such information. Not only can you verify the label’s claims, but this will also allow you to test any homemade products - for example, if you use home grown vegetables, or home baked bread. Things to think about It’s up to you to decide which types of food test you want to carry out. You will have to design the methods yourself too. Here are three suggestions to get you started: • Energy content - use a bomb calorimeter - this is how it’s done in industry. • Unsaturation of fats - you could use an iodine titration. • Determine quantities of minerals and vitamins. Useful Resources You could try to link up with dieticians from local hospitals to help with your project.

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


Back to top

Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


Back to top

Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


Back to top

Gold