Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

Views
9 months ago

Bronze Grand Challenges

Clean Growth Wind Power

Clean Growth Wind Power Activity created by Project brief In this project you will investigate wind power as a sustainable energy source and design a simple wind turbine capable of lifting a cup off the floor up to bench height. Over a third of the world’s population have no access to electricity. Because it is vital in lifting people out of poverty, the UN identified affordable and renewable energy as one of the Global Goals to solve poverty by 2030. List all the things you use electricity for in a typical day. Think about all the different ways in which electricity is generated, including renewable energy. Do some research to find out more about the advantages and disadvantages of different sources. Use your STEM skills to design a simple machine that uses wind (from a hairdryer set to cold) as the power to turn blades and lift a cup off the floor. Think about the design of the blades, how to attach the blades to a shaft and how to attach your machine to the desk. Test your machine then try adjusting size, number, shape thickness and angle of the blades and test again. After each test, record what works and what could be improved. Think about how to make testing different designs a fair test, e.g. ensuring the hairdryer is a fixed distance away from the blades. How could you make your design more sustainable, for example, by changing the materials you used or the amount of material? Things to think about • What happens when you increase the size, shape, thickness, angle or number of the blades? • Could you rely solely on wind power to generate electricity for your home? If not, why? • What materials could you use for a full-size version? • Where would be the best place for a wind turbine in your school or local area? • How do you think access to energy would change the lives of people living in the mountains of Nepal? 12 Useful resources • practicalaction.org/energy-and-theglobal-goals • practicalaction.org/energy • practicalaction.org/global-projectideas • globalgoals.org/7-affordable-andclean-energy • youtu.be/usISdE-WSWU Materials • Scrap card • Sellotape • Masking tape • Blu tack • Split pins • Pencils • Scissors • String • Paper/plastic cup • Weights (gram weights or pennies) Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resources/St udent-Safety-Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • Ensure the hairdryer is set to cold • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • make sure there is plenty of space to work; • clear up slip or trip hazards promptly; • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment.

AI and Data Fighting fires with the Internet of Things Activity created by Project brief In this project you will explore the needs of a modern firefighter, their working environment and the equipment they use. Using this research, you will generate a design for a new product which uses data collection to enhance the efficiency and/or safety of firefighters and those they help to protect. The Internet of Things is a network of connected devices such as cameras, vehicles, and sensors which interact, exchange data and automate tasks. This exchange of data and automation of tasks can be used by firefighters to help them do their jobs more safely and more efficiently. Do some research to find out more about the Internet of Things, what it is and how it is being used. Find out about the types of tasks firefighters do. When they aren’t working to put out a fire, what other tasks do they do as part of their job? Once you have a clear idea of the tasks that firefighters undertake, record the environments that they work in, the types of equipment that they currently use to do these tasks and the challenges or problems they face. Using your research, think about where the Internet of Things or connected devices could make firefighters’ jobs safer and more efficient (saving time, materials, money). You might choose to improve a piece of existing equipment or invent a completely new one. Record all your ideas and decide which one you would like to continue to develop. You could use materials like cardboard, paper, textiles and sticky tape to create a model of the final idea. If you have support from a teacher or mentor, you could try prototyping how the data collection part of your idea will work using a micro:bit or another programmable controller. Things to think about • When they aren’t working to put out a fire, what other tasks do fire fighters do as part of their job? • What tasks would a machine be better at than a human? • What do you think the role of a firefighter will be like in the future? • Could you contact a firefighter to see what they think of your idea? Useful resources • stemlearning.wistia.com/med ias/i58xdbw1ma • Programmable board (i.e. micro:bit, crumble etc.) • Contact with a fire station visit or professional firefighter Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resou rces/Student-Safety- Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • check your plan for using tools and materials with a teacher before beginning any practical work; • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. 13

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


Back to top

Bronze

Getting Started Guide: Secondary
A clean break
Bath bomb challenge
Design a game controller
Fraud detection: testing metals
Home entertainment cabinet
How do rockets work
Insulating fabrics
Make a rollercoaster faster
Make a wooden pendant
Make your own animation
Make your own fizzy drink
Make your own toothpaste
Monitoring acid rain
Plant nutrients
Quality control
Revealing fingerprints
Sailing clothing
The perfect cup of tea
Treatments for dehydration
Waste free lunch
What makes bread rise
What's in food
Which crisps are crispiest
Which material is strongest
Who is the fittest in your class
Why do we use shampoo
Plant nutrients
Treatments for dehydration
Who is the fittest in your class
Bath bomb challenge
Fraud detection: testing metals
Make your own fizzy drink
Make your own toothpaste
Monitoring acid rain
Revealing fingerprints
The perfect cup of tea
What makes bread rise
What's in food
Which crisps are crispiest
Which material is strongest
Why do we use shampoo
A clean break
Fraud detection: testing metals
Revealing fingerprints
Design a game controller
Home entertainment cabinet
Make a wooden pendant
Make your own animation
Sailing clothing
Waste free lunch
Monitoring acid rain
Plant nutrients
Waste free lunch
Bath bomb challenge
Make your own fizzy drink
Quality control
The perfect cup of tea
Waste free lunch
What's in food
Which crisps are crispiest
Why do we use shampoo
Make your own toothpaste
Treatments for dehydration
Insulating fabrics
Make a wooden pendant
Which material is strongest
A clean break
How do rockets work
Make a rollercoaster faster
Quality control
Design a game controller
Home entertainment cabinet
How do rockets work
Make a rollercoaster faster
Make your own animation
Sailing clothing
Who is the fittest in your class

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


Back to top

Silver

Getting Started Guide: Secondary
Are some jeans tougher
Art restoration
Build a model pirate ship ride
Ceramic jewellery
Cooking pasta
Design and build a disco light
Detect fraud using chromatography
Detecting drugs
Fabrics for cold weather clothing
Hit and run
How healthy is your spread
How steady is your hand
How strong are climbing ropes
Make and analyse painkillers
Make your own lipstick
Make your own tea bag
Testing toothpastes
Measuring alcohol content
Monitoring water pollution
Oral rehydration therapies
Plant growth and fertilisers
Shampoo and hair types
Testing suncreams
The fizz in fizzy drinks
The ultimate pizza box
Which crisps are healthiest
Build a model pirate ship ride
Make your own tea bag
How healthy is your spread
How steady is your hand
Monitoring water pollution
Are some jeans tougher
Art restoration
Cooking pasta
Detect fraud using chromatography
Fabrics for cold weather clothing
Hit and run
How healthy is your spread
How strong are climbing ropes
Make and analyse painkillers
Make your own lipstick
Make your own tea bag
Testing toothpastes
Measuring alcohol content
Monitoring water pollution
Oral rehydration therapies
Shampoo and hair types
Testing suncreams
The fizz in fizzy drinks
The ultimate pizza box
Which crisps are healthiest
Detect fraud using chromatography
Detecting drugs
Hit and run
Ceramic jewellery
Design and build a disco light
Fabrics for cold weather clothing
Make your own tea bag
The ultimate pizza box
Monitoring water pollution
Plant growth and fertilisers
Art restoration
Cooking pasta
How healthy is your spread
Make your own lipstick
Make your own tea bag
Testing toothpastes
Measuring alcohol content
Shampoo and hair types
The fizz in fizzy drinks
The ultimate pizza box
Which crisps are healthiest
How healthy is your spread
How steady is your hand
Make and analyse painkillers
Oral rehydration therapies
Testing suncreams
Are some jeans tougher
Art restoration
Ceramic jewellery
Fabrics for cold weather clothing
How strong are climbing ropes
Build a model pirate ship ride
Hit and run
The ultimate pizza box
Build a model pirate ship ride
Design and build a disco light
Hit and run
How steady is your hand

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


Back to top

Gold

Getting Started Guide: Secondary
A balanced diet
Aerodynamic sails
Brighter after a cup of tea
Build a model waltzer
Build a pinhole camera
Build a robotic ball boy
Compare fabric properties
Compare suncreams
Design the ultimate toothbrush
Detecting food fraud
Fruit juice or fizzy drinks
How much starch is in a potato
How quick are your reactions
Investigating crash damage
Investigating metal jewellery
Investigating vitamin supplements
Make a skateboard
Make a speaker system
Measuring alcohol levels
Monitoring lead pollution
The effect of additives on bread
The effect of treatments on hair
The perfect colour lipstick
The properties of saucepans
Which fertiliser
Build a model waltzer
Build a pinhole camera
A balanced diet
How quick are your reactions
Investigating vitamin supplements
Measuring alcohol levels
The effect of treatments on hair
Which fertiliser
A balanced diet
Brighter after a cup of tea
Compare fabric properties
Compare suncreams
Detecting food fraud
Fruit juice or fizzy drinks
How much starch is in a potato
Investigating metal jewellery
Investigating vitamin supplements
Monitoring lead pollution
The effect of additives on bread
The effect of treatments on hair
The perfect colour lipstick
The properties of saucepans
Which fertiliser
Investigating crash damage
Measuring alcohol levels
Build a pinhole camera
Build a robotic ball boy
Design the ultimate toothbrush
Make a skateboard
How much starch is in a potato
Monitoring lead pollution
Which fertiliser
Brighter after a cup of tea
Detecting food fraud
Fruit juice or fizzy drinks
How much starch is in a potato
The effect of additives on bread
The effect of treatments on hair
The perfect colour lipstick
What makes bread rise
A balanced diet
Compare suncreams
Fruit juice or fizzy drinks
Investigating vitamin supplements
Measuring alcohol levels
Compare fabric properties
Design the ultimate toothbrush
Investigating metal jewellery
The properties of saucepans
Aerodynamic sails
Build a model waltzer
Build a robotic ball boy
Investigating crash damage
Make a skateboard
Make a speaker system
Aerodynamic sails
Build a model waltzer
Build a robotic ball boy
How quick are your reactions
Investigating crash damage
Make a skateboard
Make a speaker system