Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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2 years ago

Bronze Grand Challenges

AI and Data Debating

AI and Data Debating digital privacy Activity created by Project brief In this project you will participate in a group debate about the privacy implications and potential benefits of our phone microphones ‘listening in’, before deciding on whether there should be changes in the law. Phone microphones can listen to noises and sounds around them, even when you aren’t on your phone. As a group, discuss the possible advantages and disadvantages of this technology. Now consider the question: “Should mobile phones be banned from having microphones permanently switched on?” Record what people think: “yes”, “no” or “not sure yet”. Working in a group of 4-6 students, divide the character cards between you. Take turns to read out the first section in your card. What do the others in your group think about each character? Next take turns to read out the facts. Does this change any opinions? Now take turns to ask a question to another character in your group. Once the debate is over, vote “yes”, “no” or “not sure yet” again. Have opinions changed? Why? Use the internet to research the issues further. Find out what the law says about digital privacy and how this might impact smart phone technology. What might happen in the future as new technology becomes available? Either individually or as a group, decide on where you stand and whether or not there should be a ban or changes to the law to protect privacy. Select the evidence which best supports your position. Prepare a presentation with your ideas and reasons. Things to think about • Who might benefit most from phones which are always listening? • Who should decide how technology is used in our lives? • Should there be changes to the law? Useful resources • Printed character cards from debate.imascientist.org. uk/privacy-resources • Access to the internet Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resou rces/Student-Safety- Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. 14

Ageing Society | AI and Data Accessible messenger Activity created by Project brief Technology is changing the way we communicate, often making it faster and easier to get the message across. It is important that technology is improving everyone’s lives and is accessible to all age groups. In this project you will try out apps which improve communication. You will interview people of different ages at home and in school to gather data about how they use tech to help them communicate and what, if any, barriers they face using technology. You will need to communicate your findings in a magazine article, blog or vlog post. Does your social media feed suggest responses to you? How would you quickly translate a message that was in a foreign language? What other examples can you find of how artificial intelligence is being used to improve communication? Find and try out a range of web or mobile applications which use tech to help people communicate. You could include apps which translate between foreign languages and/or apps which help people with hearing impairments, visual impairments or dyslexia. Compare the apps, recording the target audience, the purpose and the features they offer. Design and carry out a survey to find out how people of different ages currently use tech to communicate, what challenges they face and what they think of the current apps available. You could ask them what methods they use to communicate including what apps (if any) they use. You should aim to ask people of a range of different ages including older adults. Research the future of communication technology. Will it help to solve some of the challenges people currently face? Write a magazine, blog or video blog post to communicate the findings from your survey and research. Things to think about • How has communication changed since you were younger? • What communication channel do people of different ages use most often? • Are the latest communication apps accessible to everyone? Is anyone missing out? • Which apps were most useful in helping people translate between different languages? • How do you think artificial intelligence will improve communication in the future? Useful resources • A smartphone and access to free apps; • Access to the internet for research; • Access to volunteers of different ages to interview. Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resou rces/Student-Safety- Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • take care if collecting any personal data in your survey; • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. 15

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold