Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


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2 years ago

Bronze Grand Challenges

Ageing Society | AI and

Ageing Society | AI and Data | Clean Growth | Future of Mobility Create an App for Good Activity created by Project brief In this project you will design an app to make a positive difference for people in your local area. For example, it might help people travel around more easily, prevent waste going to landfill or get people together to overcome loneliness. You will need to create an app outline showing what it will look like and a short report explaining how the app works, who the target audience is and how you came up with the idea. Ask your teacher to sign up to Apps for Good and create a passcode for you at: dashboard.appsforgood.org/public/educators/sign_up Use your pass code to set a student account at: dashboard.appsforgood.org/public/students/sign_up You can access resources from Apps for Good to help you through all the stages in designing a concept for a new app. Start by listing local issues related to the Grand Challenges that you’d like to solve. For example, you could consider accessible transport, services for older people, renewable energy or reducing waste. Perhaps there is a problem which is relevant to your local area or community, or you might choose to tackle a problem in your school. Choose one problem and the target audience. Next search for free apps which relate to the problem you are trying to solve. You could each find one and try it and then explain it to the rest of the group. Who is the audience? What does it do? What data does it collect and how is this data used? Finalise the ideas for your own app. Create a wire frame of your app to show the different screens the user will see. Write a short report explaining who the target audience is, the problem it will solve, what data it will collect and how it will work. Useful resources • appsforgood.org Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resou rces/Student-Safety- Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • take care if collecting any personal data; • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. Things to think about • Who is your target audience, what are their needs? • What apps already exist for this? • Can you adapt one to make it better? • Are there any ethical risks to your idea? • How will you ensure data is kept securely? 16

Ageing Society | Clean Growth | Future of Mobility A Home for Everyone Activity created by Project brief There’s been lots in the news about a UK house shortage. Your challenge is to design a house that is safe, comfortable, accessible and secure, that supports health and well-being; a house that is truly a home. You’ll need to produce a site plan, floor plan and elevation drawings along with a report explaining how you approached the project. Start by downloading a copy of the Home for Everyone resource pack which has case studies and web links to help with research and tips for completing this project. Designers, engineers and construction professionals are working together to create the ideal inclusive house. Get your team together for a discussion about what “inclusive design” means. Read the case study for Anytown Street from the resource pack and think about the range of people who live in your community, those who live on your street and in your town. Decide who your target audience will be. What are the needs of the family as whole and as individuals? Are their needs likely to change? Do some research to find out about best practice in inclusive house design. Find out how smart technology can be used to improve new homes and how they can be made more energy efficient. Get in touch with local built environment professionals in architecture, landscape, surveying, energy and engineering; local house builders can help too. Find out about the different ways your house can be powered. If you’re good with pens and pencils, get creative on paper. If you prefer a digital approach, you could use any drawing/ modelling software to present your designs. Things to think about • Can you make your house more energy efficient? • How could technology improve people’s lives? • What might you include, or even invent to make life easier? • Consider what types of vehicle need parking and how much space will be needed to get in and out. • Will your house be accessible for everyone? Useful resources • You can access the ‘Home for Everyone’ resource pack by contacting STEAM@classofyourown.co m • You can find more design and construction related projects as well as information about careers in this sector at designengineerconstruct.com Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resou rces/Student-Safety- Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. 17

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold