Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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2 years ago

Build a model waltzer

  • Text
  • Waltzer
  • Sensor
  • Newton
  • Measures
  • Meter
  • Meters
  • Pulls
  • Measured
  • Extension
  • Principles
This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

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Page 1 of 2 Build a model waltzer As a waltzer moves around, the people in each ‘car’ experience a force. The bigger the force, the bigger the ‘thrill’. Can you build a model waltzer system that measures this force? Getting Started First, think about the kind of force sensor that could be used, and decide on one. Making the sensor: How can you measure force? Usually, a newton meter is used. Newton meters work using a spring-balance system, a weight pulls on the spring and the force is measured by the extension of the spring. If you’re going to measure the force as the waltzer moves around, how can you read the scale? Is it possible to design a sensor that works on the same principles, but allows remote measurements? Invariably this will need an electric or electronic system. Building the waltzer: The main component of your waltzer needs to be a ‘car’ that rotates and spins in a controlled manner. Your force sensor needs to be mounted in the car, and the signals from the sensor need to be detected. • How will you do this without getting a load of wires tangled up? • How will you get the whole ride to move? • How can the cars spin? How can the cars move up and down? • You may need several motors that control a movement each …. but how will you control the speed of each motor? Click to edit project description Testing your ride: How does the force vary as you change the ride? What happens if the force gets too big? Is there a limit to the amount of force that a passenger can take? Things to think about Once you have a working sensor, how will you mount it onto a model waltzer? How can you get the waltzer to rotate? Can you think of how to get the cars to rotate as the whole ride rotates? Can you get the cars to move up and down as the whole thing moves around? Useful Resources You could contact a local electronics company to see if they can help you build a sensor. You could try to contact a company that manufacture theme park rides. You’ll need to find out if, for example, there is a maximum amount of G-Force that rides are legally (and safely) allowed to produce. You can also find out how they test their rides.

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold