Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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2 years ago

Investigating crash damage

  • Text
  • Vehicles
  • Bodywork
  • Investigate
  • Factors
  • Travelling
  • Collision
  • Velocity
  • Extent
  • Collisions
  • Suitable
This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

Click to edit project

Click to edit project description

Page 1 of 2 Investigating crash damage Getting Started A family car travelling at 30mph has about 90 kJ of kinetic energy. In a crash, this reduces to zero almost instantly. Vehicle designers aim to ensure that this energy is transferred and dissipated as safely as possible. ‘Crumple zones’ are designed to absorb the energy by using it to bend the metal bodywork into a crumpled mass. In a head-on collision between two similar vehicles, travelling at the same speed in opposite directions, double the energy has to be dissipated. Does this result in greater damage? Is the damage evened out between the two vehicles? What if the vehicles are travelling at different speed, but the same combined speed (closing speed) as before? First, design suitable model vehicles. The ‘bodywork’ must remain attached to the ‘chassis’ during collisions, but must be renewable after each collision. Work out a set of criteria for the bodywork design; e.g. it must crumple on collision, not just bend and spring back. You are not trying to compare materials for making actual car bodywork, but you may wish to do some preliminary tests to decide the best material to use in your models. Taking measurements: Think about how you will measure the velocity of each vehicle just before collision. You also need to devise procedures and criteria for assessing and comparing the amount of damage caused by collisions. Initially, investigate the effects of speed on the damage caused by: Click to edit project description One vehicle colliding with a hard, immovable object (corresponding to a wall) at various velocities; Two vehicles colliding head-on with various individual speeds, but a constant closing speed. Consider what other factors are likely to influence the amount of damage caused in a collision. Investigate the effects of one of these. Things to think about You need to devise a method of getting your vehicles up to the required speed, and of controlling and varying that speed. Controlling direction is also important if your vehicles are to collide head-on. Useful Resources You could seek advice and guidance for your project from professionals such as car manufacturers’ design and testing departments, vehicle accident research organisations, police traffic section or professional accident investigators. Your results Draw conclusions from your results about the quantitative relationship between the extent of damage and the collision speed - or any other factors you investigated. Display your results in a suitable manner to illustrate your conclusions.

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold