Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

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Scotland

Wales


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10 months ago

Machine Learning Bronze

Teacher guide Taught by

Teacher guide Taught by technology AI in education generally focuses on identifying what students do and don’t know through testing, and developing personalised curricula based on students’ specific needs. In this project students will find and try out a range of educational applications that use AI for one or more of the following: generating smart content (e.g. condensing text book content into quizzes); intelligent tutoring systems (personalised to the learning styles of the pupil); and/or virtual learning environments (virtual tutors). Students will be challenged to design and conduct an investigation to compare and evaluate AI powered education apps, conducting tests, surveys and interviews to gather data about the effectiveness of educational apps. They will need to think about what indicators they will use as measures, how to conduct a fair test, and how to collect and analyse their data. Prompts • How many participants will you use? How long will your study be? • Will participants use the app once for a long duration, or lots of times but for short durations? Why? • Remind students to think about all the variables in their investigation. • Students should think about how they will measure their results before starting any practical investigation. 10

Student brief Taught by technology AI is being used in education to help identify what students do and don’t know through testing, and developing personalised curricula based on students’ specific needs. There are apps that gamify learning through quizzes, AI tutors that you can have conversations with, and school management systems to help teachers understand how their students are performing. Imagine you are a headteacher. Some of your students want to learn a new instrument, and others want to learn a new language, but you can’t find the teachers to teach it. Some other schools in the area are starting to offer lessons without teachers, where students learn from apps that use machine learning, and you want to find out more. Conduct an experiment to find out how effective apps are and how they compare to learning from a teacher. Getting started Start by choosing either a musical instrument or a language for the apps you will investigate. Next you will need to find some apps to test, do some research online and pick at least 2 apps to compare. Then you will need to recruit participants for your experiment. There will be lots of variables in your experiment. Where possible you should try to control these, or make sure you are only changing one at a time. Before starting your experiment, make sure you have planned how you will measure your results and how you will keep your test fair. Things to think about • Do your participants have any knowledge of the subject before starting your experiment? Try to find people with no previous knowledge in the subject, so that everyone is starting from the same point. • How many participants will you recruit for each group? Will they all be from the same year group or will you use students from different year groups? Try to make sure each group has a similar number and type of participants. • How long will they spend on the apps? What time of day will they use the apps? • How will you measure the results? Can you create some kind of test that participants take before and after using the app, so that you can measure how much progress they make? • Will you also compare your results to students that had no lessons? How could this technology complement the role of the teacher for the overall benefit to the student? Useful resources • Apps for students bigdatamadesimple.com/how-apps-for-studentsare-using-ai-for-doing-lessons-better/ • Duolingo research ai.duolingo.com/ • Machine learning in education trueinteraction.com/ai-and-the-classroommachine-learning-in-education/ • Second langauge learning medium.com/@sanalabs/the-unreasonableeffectiveness-of-deep-learning-in-languagelearning-bededd4cba10 • AI tutor https://www.korbit.ai/ Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • Find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using http://science.cleapss.org.uk/Resources/Stu dent-Safety-Sheets/ to assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be). • Decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on). • Make sure there is plenty of space to work. • Clear up slip or trip hazards promptly. • Make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. 11

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold