Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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2 years ago

Make a speaker system

  • Text
  • Speaker
  • Speakers
  • Magnetic
  • Produced
  • Sizes
  • Frequency
  • Materials
  • Recycled
  • Motor
  • Fields
This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

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Click to edit project description www.crestawards.org

Page 1 of 2 Design and build a speaker system In this project you will design and build your own working speaker system. Speakers work by using the motor effect, two magnetic fields interact with each other, making a paper cone vibrate in an out. One magnetic field is produced by a permanent magnet, and the second, by the electric current from the sound signal. Getting started If you look at a series of different commercially produced speakers, they will all have features in common, but speakers come in all sorts of shapes and sizes, why is this? Find out about the different geometries of coil and magnet. Design your own system using scrap or readily available materials. You may need to experiment with different designs first. Use your design to build a set of speakers – you will have found out that different sizes are needed to get the full frequency range. How can you incorporate these into a speaker system? You could try to make your speaker system for a particular purpose. For example, you might try to make the smallest possible speaker with a decent range that can be hidden in the corner of a room. Try playing a series of music tracks through your speaker system. Repeat this test using a set of commercial speakers. What is the difference? Things to think about What materials are available to you to make a speaker from? Could you use recycled materials? Could you make a speaker from recycled materials? If you design a speaker for a phone, how would it work? What equipment will you use to test your speaker? How will you compare your speaker to a commercial one? Useful resources Contact a local electronics company to help you find out about how speakers work. Contact a speaker manufacturer to find out how they test their products. You could use a microphone connected, through a computer’s sound card, to an oscilloscope programme to compare the signals. What are the similarities and differences? You could try to increase the scale of the project by making an entire surround sound system. You’ll have to carry out more research to find out about the different frequency ranges that different speakers have. You’ll also have to think about making a dedicated bass unit (a sub-woofer). Click to edit project description

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold