Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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2 years ago

Make your own animation

Learn about animations by designing and making your own. This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

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Click to edit project description

Page 1 of 2 Make your own animation Animation is used in all sorts of TV programmes and films. In this project you will learn about animations by designing and making your own. Start by finding out about all the different types. For example, what sort of animation is used in Wallace & Gromit or The Simpsons, or big pictures like Toy Story 3 and Up. Getting Started Carry out some research into the history of animation. Spinning animations: In 1860 Pierre Desvignes put a strip of paper containing drawings on the inside of a drum- like cylinder (sometimes called a ‘kinetoscope’). The drum twirled on a spindle. If you looked through slits near the top of the drum the drawings seemed to come to life – they were moving. For the main part of this project you’re going to design and make a similar device. The drum: • What will the drum be made from, and how big will it be? • How will you make the drum spin? Will you use a motor? • How can you design it to spin at the right speed all the time? • How far apart will the slits be? • Will you make it so that you can insert different animations? • Will it be hand held, or will you be able to mount it on, say, a table? • The film strip: • What will your animation be of? Click to edit project your film, description you could: There are several ways you can make • Draw or paint characters. • Use models and take photographs of each frame. • Make a short film and print out individual frames. • How many pictures will make up your animation? • What material will you use to make the ‘reel’? It will need to bend around the inside of the drum, but if it’s too flimsy it might break. Things to think about What did people do before Thomas Edison developed the motion camera? Try to explain how early forms of animation are dependent on the human eye’s ‘persistence of vision’. You may need to ask your teacher for some help with this. Try using science books as well as the internet to help your explanation. Two early forms of simple animation are the ‘thaumatrope’ and the‘phenakistoscope’. You should research these and make them yourself. Useful Resources Search for a ginger beer recipe online. Presenting your motion picture: You could create a presentation using your research and homemade animations, this could tell people about the history of animation.

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold