Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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Silver Grand Challenges

  • Text
  • Industrial
  • Hydrogen
  • Ageing
  • Challenges
  • Crest
  • Solar
  • Reduce
  • Materials
  • Methods
  • Mobility

Clean Growth | Future of

Clean Growth | Future of Mobility Hydrogen fuel cell Project brief In this project you will design a prototype fuel cell, which you will present at a Dragons’ Den type forum, to bid for further development funding. Your first step is to undertake practical experiments to: • Investigate factors that affect the performance of a hydrogen fuel cell; • Evaluate methods of generating hydrogen for use in fuel cells. Vehicle exhaust fumes pose serious pollution problems in cities. One suggestion is to use hydrogen as a fuel instead of petrol and diesel – but that’s not as simple as it sounds. Hydrogen-powered vehicles do exist, but so far, they are still experimental. Many cities around the world are trying out hydrogen buses. Several car manufacturers are developing hydrogen models. Are you about to witness a ‘green transport’ revolution? Start by researching hydrogen fuel cells. You should find out about the fuel cell components and their functions and the reactants and products in cell reactions. Make a hydrogen fuel cell with the model kit. Alternatively design your own simple fuel cell. Show your design to your teacher before making it. Set up an experiment to measure the performance of your fuel cell. You will need to measure the energy input and output. You can then use this to calculate the efficiency. Design a series of experiments to find out the affects of different designs on its performance. Consider what characteristics you will change. Make sure you only change one variable at a time to keep it a fair test. You could try changing: • Electrodes – type of material, size, shape, distance apart. • Electrolytes – solute, solvent, concentration, solid electrolyte / membrane. • Physical design – arrangement of components, overall size, shape and mass. Record your results in an appropriate way and draw conclusions about how each variable affects the performance. Things to think about • How does a hydrogen fuel cell work? • How does altering the design of a fuel cell affect its performance? • How can you measure the performance of a fuel cell? • How effective are hydrogen fuel cells compared with other ‘green’ energy sources, such as biodiesel? • If hydrogen fuel cell vehicles become common, where will all the hydrogen come from? Useful resources • Ask your teacher for a model kit for making a hydrogen fuel cell (available from laboratory suppliers, usually with instructions for various investigations). Normal laboratory equipment for: • measuring heat and electrical energy; • generating hydrogen and oxygen, including by electrolysis; • hydrogen vehicles worldwide; • hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells; • how hydrogen fuel cells work; • making a rudimentary DIY hydrogen fuel cell (Alternatively, use carbon electrodes, collecting gases in electrolytefilled test tubes above them). Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resources/ Student-Safety-Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. 14

Ageing Society Antimicrobial resistance and healthy ageing Activity created by Project brief In this project you will research antimicrobial resistance and ageing and produce a presentation and infographic for a global nonspecialist audience to raise awareness of the most important issues and how they should be solved. Antimicrobials, especially antibiotics, are becoming less effective in part due to overuse and incorrect usage. Action regarding antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is necessary so that it does not impede the Grand Challenge ambition for people to enjoy at least five extra healthy, independent years of life, by 2035. Start by researching disease areas which affect the immune system (e.g. diabetes and cancer). Research what steps can be taken to reduce risk of developing such diseases. Identify the link between a weakened immune system and developing an infection from multi-resistant bacteria. Identify how antimicrobial resistance could impede ambitions for people to enjoy at least five extra healthy, independent years of life, by 2035. Produce a presentation, together with a summary infographic, for a non-specialist audience which covers what you have researched. Things to think about • Who will benefit from reduced susceptibility to infection from multi-resistant bacteria? • What is antimicrobial resistance and why is it an issue that impacts on everyone? • What are the diseases which weaken the immune system? • What steps can society take now, to reduce future risk of developing diseases which weaken the immune system? • What are the factors which could have an impact on the ambition for people to enjoy at least five extra healthy, independent years of life, by 2035? Useful resources • abpischools.org.uk/topic/antimi crobial-resistance • abpischools.org.uk/ • abpi.org.uk/what-we-do/globalcampaigns/we-wont-rest/forthe-chance/ • antibioticguardian.com/keepantibiotics-working/ • improvement.nhs.uk/resources/f ighting-antimicrobialresistance/ • euro.who.int/en/healthtopics/diseaseprevention/antimicrobialresistance/news/news/2018/11/ of-all-human-diseases,-60- originate-in-animals-one-healthis-the-only-way-to-keepantibiotics-working • youtube.com/watch?time_conti nue=6&v=zbV7Y_j3s9M • youtube.com/watch?time_conti nue=1&v=SfT79NaQoIE • apps.beta.nhs.uk/?page=1 Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resource s/Student-Safety-Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. 15

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold