Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


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Silver Grand Challenges

  • Text
  • Industrial
  • Hydrogen
  • Ageing
  • Challenges
  • Crest
  • Solar
  • Reduce
  • Materials
  • Methods
  • Mobility

AI and Data Future farm

AI and Data Future farm Project brief In this project you will investigate how artificial intelligence could be used to increase food production and design and test an AI tool to recognise when fruit is ready for picking. Either research on the internet or interview someone who works on a farm to find out what is involved in growing food commercially. Make a list of the tasks which need doing. Do some research to find out how AI works and how this technology is being developed to support farming. You could investigate farm drones which use machine visual recognition technology, farming chatbots and farming apps like Plantix. An artificially intelligent system learns using examples rather than following a set of instructions. You will need to train the computer using lots of example images of fruit, both ripe and unripe. Decide what fruit or crop you will use and how you think the system might work. Use machinelearningforkids.co.uk or a similar web-based tool to try out ideas. Ask your teacher to set up an account for you. Use the project worksheets on this website to give you more ideas for your own project. Decide how many images you will need to collect, how you will group them into classes, how varied the images will be and how you will know once you have enough. You may need to experiment with the computer model to see what works. Once you have created a trained model, test it to see how effective it is. Consider how your tool could be used on a real farm and how it might need to be adapted. Things to think about • How does the variety of images affect how successful your tool is? • How useful would your tool be for farmers? • How could your tool be combined with other technology to make it more useful? • What tasks in growing food might a computer be better at than a human being? • What impact do you think AI technology will have on farming in the future? Useful resources • microsoft.com/enus/research/project/farmbea ts-iot-agriculture/ • ensia.com/features/deeplearning/ • handsfreehectare.com • teachablemachine.withgoogl e.com • machinelearningforkids.co.uk • plantix.net • plantvillage.psu.ed Health and safety To avoid any accidents, make sure you stick to the following health and safety guidelines before getting started: • find out if any of the materials, equipment or methods are hazardous using science.cleapss.org.uk/Resou rces/Student-Safety- Sheets/ • assess the risks (think about what could go wrong and how serious it might be); • ask an adult to set you up with a student account when using web applications; • decide what you need to do to reduce any risks (such as wearing personal protective equipment, knowing how to deal with emergencies and so on); • remember, never consume or taste food or drink in the laboratory or which has been opened in the laboratory; • make sure your teacher agrees with your plan and risk assessment. 18

Managed by www.crestawards.org email: crest@britishscienceassociation.org The British Science Association is the operating name and trade mark of the British Association for the Advancement of Science Registered charity: 212479 and SC039236 19

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold