Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


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2 years ago

The effect of treatments on hair

  • Text
  • Treatments
  • Applying
  • Sufficient
  • Length
  • Microscope
  • Method
  • Methods
  • Qualitative
  • Quantitative
  • Curly
Consider the impact of treatments on different types of hair. This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

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Click to edit project description

Page 1 ong>ofong> 2 ong>Theong> ong>effectong> ong>ofong> ong>treatmentsong> on hair In this project you will be investigating hair to gain both qualitative and quantitative data. You will look at the appearance ong>ofong> hair and you will measure its strength. Getting Started You need to make sure you have a sufficient amount ong>ofong> different hair types (straight, curly, thick and thin for example) to give you meaningful results. You also need a sufficient number ong>ofong> hairs from each hair type, and you will need to measure the thickness ong>ofong> your hair samples. When you test the untreated hair for strength it will break. ong>Theong>refore, if you want to determine the ong>effectong> ong>ofong> applying ong>treatmentsong>, you will need to use a hair that is as similar as possible to the first- same type, length, diameter etc. Pre-treatment: Look at the hair samples under a microscope and describe any characteristics. Decide on a decent method for testing strength. Now test the strength ong>ofong> your hair samples to gain a value before applying any treatment. Applying the ong>treatmentsong>: It’s up to you what sorts ong>ofong> ong>treatmentsong> you want to test. Some suggestions are, curling or straightening hair, blow-drying hair or using hairspray. Post-treatment: When the treatment has been applied, you need to look at them again under the microscope. Describe any changes you see. Work out if the ong>treatmentsong> have done anything to the hair samples that you believe may decrease its strength. Explain why it’s important to look at the full length ong>ofong> the hair. Make an educated guess where you think the hair will break. You then need to test the strength ong>ofong> the treated hair. Has it decreased or increased? Did it break where you thought it would break? Click to edit project description Things to think about Remember to keep all non-variables constant when applying ong>treatmentsong>. For example, if you’re testing different shampoos you’ll need to keep the temperature ong>ofong> the water, the amount ong>ofong> shampoo and the method ong>ofong> drying constant. Useful Resources You will need to link up with mentors from industry or local further/higher education colleges for a couple ong>ofong> reasons. Firstly, it would be useful to use a powerful microscope to look at your hair samples. Secondly, you will need to investigate industrial methods for testing strength. You’ll have to work out what sort ong>ofong> strength you’ll be testing and adapt a procedure accordingly. You might also want to visit a hairdresser and find out what sort ong>ofong> ong>treatmentsong> they recommend for particular hair types and why.

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold