Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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2 years ago

Waste free lunch

Introduce a ‘waste-free’ lunch programme. This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

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Page 1 of 2 Waste-free lunch programme The idea of this project is to introduce a school lunch programme to your school or college. The programme should encourage pupils to use recycled or re-usable packaging for their lunches. Produce a leaflet and/or poster presentation for the school. You will also carry out some tests on reusable packaging to check it’s suitable. Getting Started Testing alternative packaging: You should think about what alternatives might be used to store packed lunches. Then you should carry out some tests to make sure your ideas still keep food fresh, for example: Crisps usually come in a packet that gets thrown away. So why not buy a bigger bag and bring just enough crisps to school in something else. When you’ve thought of a few alternatives, carry out a ‘sogginess’ test. Leave different containers of crisps for a day and see which ones remain crunchy. Make sure you use the same type of crisps in each container. Put the same amount of crisps in each container Store all the containers in the same place Leave a normal packet of crisps for a day as well - this will be your benchmark. Drinks often come in cans or plastic bottles that also create waste. Find out what sort of cans are best for recycling. You could also tell people how and where to recycle cans. The other alternative is to buy a big bottle and bring just enough for one day in a reusable container. Again, you could carry out a test to make sure your alternative container keeps the drink fizzy. Click to edit project description Testing packaging strength: Packed lunches can often get bashed around in your school bag, but you don’t want squashed sandwiches or broken biscuits. Design an experiment to see what happens to your packed lunch when it gets bashed about. Work out a way of simulating how much a packed lunch gets bashed around during a school day. This might include dropping the packed lunch to see if anything gets damaged. . Things to think about What sorts of packaging people use at the moment to store their packed lunch How much of it is reusable? Don’t just look at lunch boxes – think about everything inside it. Crisps, sandwiches, even some fruit. Which bits of waste from your packed lunch are biodegradable? How do you think they will be disposed of? Can any packaging be recycled? If so, how and where? Useful Resources Why not ask your fellow students what sort of foods they bring for lunch?

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold