Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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2 years ago

What makes bread rise

  • Text
  • Dough
  • Flour
  • Flours
  • Tubes
  • Breads
  • Ingredients
  • Wheat
  • Knead
  • Tube
  • Risen
Investigate different bread recipes and design an experiment to get the perfect rise. This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

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Click to edit project description

Page 1 of 2 What makes bread rise? Different types of flour are used to make different types of bread. Most flours are made from grinding wheat. There are also other types of flour, which are made from other ingredients such as rice, potatoes and soya. Some people can’t eat bread because they’re allergic to wheat or gluten which is in wheat. So they have to use alternatives, for example gluten-free flour. In this project, you’re going to make bread dough using some different types of flour. You’ll compare how well the bread rises. Getting Started Things to think about Making bread dough: You’ll need flour, water and yeast to make bread dough. Make some small quantities of dough using each of your different flours. Make sure you use the same quantity of ingredients for each dough. Knead the bread dough. Dough is kneaded to trap air in it – remember, to get accurate results you should knead each dough for the same length of time. Push each bread dough into the bottom of an empty boiling tube - the boiling tubes should all be the same size. Make a mark on the side of each boiling tube to show where the dough comes up to and label it. Leave the boiling tubes at a temperature of 35 oC, the dough needs to be at this temperature to rise. Leave your dough for 30 minutes then look at your boiling tubes again. Mark where the level of the dough is in the tube. The results: Compare your different bread doughs and measure how much they’ve risen by. If you have time, try making some bread using different yeast. Click to edit project description You could look at: How well the bread has risen after baking? How do the different breads look? How do they smell? Compare your different breads again when they are cool. Which type of flour was in the dough that rose the most? Which type of flour was in the dough that rose the least? If you make the dough into bread: What do the loaves you have made look like inside? Are there lots of holes? Are they hard or soft? How else could you compare the loaves? Useful Resources Visit a supermarket and look at the different types of flour available. If you read the packets some will be suitable for bread-making. Choose a range of wheat flours and non-wheat flours (for example gluten-free or potato flour) to make bread dough with.

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold