Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

Views
2 years ago

Which material is strongest

Test materials to find out the strength of each. This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

Click to edit project

Click to edit project description

Page 1 of 2 Which material is the strongest? In this project, you will test the strength of samples from different items of clothing to find out which material is the strongest Getting Started You should begin by choosing your clothes. For example, you could test a piece of denim from a pair of jeans, or a piece of cotton from a T-shirt. Make sure you use old clothes, or someone may get cross when you cut up their favourite T-shirt! You should cut pieces of material from the clothes - these are called your samples. To make sure you carry out a fair test, you should make sure your samples are all the same size. One way to see which material is strongest would be to hang weights from it until it breaks. The one that holds the most weight is the strongest. If you use this sort of test you should use thin strips of material, otherwise you might need really heavy weights to make it break. You should have more than one sample of each material. This means you can do the tests more than once. It will give you better results because if you make any mistakes they will be easier to spot. Things to think about What will you use as the weight? How will you attach weights to the end of the material? How will you be able to add more weights? How many weights will you add each time? How will you hold the material in place? How will you make the apparatus safe? For example, you don’t want heavy weights falling onto your toes when the material breaks - something to catch the weights will be useful. Useful Resources For bath bombs you can often find recipes on the internet, try searching for “homemade bath bomb”. You may also be able to find recipes in books in the library. For the mould you could buy one, recycle something, or make your own. The results: Make a note of the size of your samples. Some materials can be very strong and it might not be safe to carry on adding weights until it breaks. What is the heaviest weight that your weight-catcher could safely cope with? Click to edit project description How could you adjust the test so that less heavy loads were needed? You will need to write down the weight that broke each piece of material. You can call this the breaking strength. Make sure you use the same units each time - in other words, all the results should be measured in kilograms or grams, but not a mixture of both.

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


Back to top

Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


Back to top

Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


Back to top

Gold