Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


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2 years ago

Who is the fittest in your class

Measure the baseline level of fitness of a group of volunteers. This resource is published under an Attribution - non-commercial - no derivatives 4.0 International creative commons licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). For more information visit our Terms and Conditions (www.crestawards.org/terms-and-conditions).

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Page 1 of 2 Who is the fittest in your class? In this project, you will measure the baseline level of fitness of a group of volunteers by recording how long it takes for their pulse rate to return to normal after exercise. Getting Started To get started you should do some research, make sure you: • Can explain what ‘fit’ and ‘fitness’ mean • Know what a ‘pulse rate’ is and how you can measure it. Secondly, you need to find a group of volunteers to test. You could try asking your class or a sports team. Your task is to find out how fit they are by measuring their baseline level of fitness. Baseline level of fitness is the time it takes for someone’s accelerated pulse rate to return to their resting pulse rate. Do some research on what a resting pulse rate is. Raising the pulse: Make sure you do a fair test. There are lots of things that have to be kept the same. For example: • Decide what sort of exercise everyone will do. It should get their pulse rates up, but not be too hard. Otherwise some people won’t be able to do it! Some examples are running, sit ups or step ups. • Everyone should do the same amount of exercise for the same length of time. Click to edit project • Everyone description should rest for the same period of time. • You should take everyone’s pulse in the same way. You should also think about whether or not you’re going to test everyone at the same time. If you do, then you’ll need some helpers to take everyone’s pulse. • Decide how many times you should do the test. Will once be enough? Things to think about You need to decide if you want to test: • All girls, all boys, or a mixture of both • People of the same age or different age groups. Why not make some predictions about who will have the higher baseline level of fitness? For instance, if you have people from different sport teams, which team do you think will have better fitness levels? Useful Resources Why not ask your PE teacher to help with this project? The results You should record your pulse rate readings in a table, before and after exercise. You should have a list of times next to everyone’s name. These are the times it took for their accelerated pulse rates to return to their resting pulse rates. Make sure the times are given in the same unit (in other words, they should all be in seconds or minutes). Put everyone in order of recovery time. The fittest people are the ones whose pulse rate returns to normal in the quickest time. You could draw a bar chart to display your results. Work out the average recovery time for the group of people you tested. You do this by adding all the times together, and dividing it by the number of people you tested. Ask your teacher if you need some help with this. Was there a difference between boys and girls? Was there a relationship between recovery time and age?

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold