Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


To browse the briefs, click the buttons below or scroll down.

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3 years ago

World wide washing collection

top toilets!

top toilets! Communication project Have you ever wondered…how simple solutions can improve people’s health and wellbeing? Imagine you are a WASH (Water and Sanitation) expert working for the international development charity Practical Action. You will know that good sanitation improves lives. Composting toilets or other simple sanitation solutions can make a big difference but sometimes you need to persuade the communities you want to help to see the benefits for the time and effort they will need to put in. Use your communication skills to: • Explain why developing simple low tech sanitation solutions benefits the health of the whole community • How better sanitation protects vulnerable people Useful Links www.bit.ly/40-shocking-facts-about-water Interesting facts and statistics on water www.unicef.org/wash/index_wes_related.html Information about common water and sanitation-related diseases www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCKsU4bPFOQ Video on why Global Goal 6 is important in eradicating poverty www.wateraid.org Information about the challenges of water and sanitation www.practicalaction.org/improved-toilets-3 Sanitation systems used in different countries Some things to think about... • What low tech but effective sanitation solutions are there? • How do these systems work, what materials are required and how much time and effort is needed to build them? • How will the maintenance of these systems be organised? • Why do these systems benefit groups such as the elderly or women in particular? • What problems might going to the toilet in the open cause? • Which groups are the hardest to persuade to use toilets and why? • What economic benefits might the community gain from developing such systems? • Does defecation into standing water have other disease implications? Health and safety If you carry out any experiments or practical activities then you will need to put together a risk assessment. To do this you will need to: 1. Find out if any of the substances , equipment or procedures you plan to use are hazardous 2. Assess the risk to yourself and others (which means what could go wrong and how serious that could be, low medium or high) 3. Decide what you need to do to reduce that risk e.g. wearing goggles or other protective equipment and knowing how to deal with any potential accidents You will need to show your risk assessment to your teacher and get his/her approval before doing any practical activities. Remember! Judges will be looking for projects that demonstrate good communication skills, show innovation and creativity and that address a real-world problem. Use the Student Profile form to help structure your project www.crestawards.org

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold