Secondary project briefs (ages 11+)


Bronze Awards are typically completed by students aged 11+. They complete a ten-hour project which is a perfect introduction to STEM project work. Over the course of the project, teams of students design their own investigation, record their findings, and reflect on their learnings. This process gives students a taste of what it is like to be a scientist or engineer in the real-world.


Silver Awards are typically completed by students aged 14+ over thirty hours. Project work at Silver level is designed to stretch your students and enrich their STEM studies. Students direct the project, determining the project’s aim and how they will achieve it. They carry out the project, record and analyse their results and reflect on the project and their learnings. All Silver projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform.


Gold Awards are typically completed by students aged 16+ over seventy hours. Students’ projects are self-directed, longer term and immerse them in real research. At this level, we recommend students work with a mentor from their chosen STEM field of study. All Gold projects are assessed by CREST assessors via our online platform. There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


There are more CREST approved resources that have been developed by our partners and providers specific to your region.


Find out how to build practical CREST projects into secondary science lessons using our free teacher guidance pack. Supporting this guidance are easy-to-use, free-to-download mapping workbooks, which match individual Bronze, Silver and Gold CREST Award projects with each area of the secondary science curricula for England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. You can download and save your own copy of the relevant mapping workbook via the following links:


England

Northern Ireland

Scotland

Wales


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2 years ago

World wide washing collection

sanitation for all

sanitation for all Communication project Have you ever wondered…how communities in developing countries improve their living conditions? Imagine you are the director of a Non- Governmental Organisation that seeks to improve the sanitation in slums in the poorest parts of the developing world e.g. Nakuru in Kenya. You are trying to persuade a group of local government officials to invest in infrastructure needed to develop an organised sanitation system. Mobilising the support from residents will be important. You will need to consider ongoing maintenance as well as the set up costs, how might these be funded on an ongoing basis? Use your communication skills to: • Persuade officials and residents why they should invest in this development • Inform them of other successful projects from around the world • Explain the health and other benefits that could be the result of such a project Some things to think about... • Previous successful projects that you can demonstrate using ‘case studies’ • Projects that have failed in the past and why • The costs involved • The funding that could be used to support these developments • The benefits to health and wellbeing that would result • Persuading local officials who may not live in the area themselves that this is an important project Useful Links You may find some of the links below useful for your project: www.unicef.org/wash/index_wes_related.html Information about common water and sanitation-related diseases www.wateraid.org Information about the challenges of water and sanitation www.practicalaction.org/improved-toilets-3 Sanitation systems used in different countries www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/health/ Information on Global Goal 3 ‘Health and Wellbeing’ www.saps.org.uk/secondary/teachingresources/839-extracting-oil-from-plants-gcse Resources on different extraction techniques Health and safety If you carry out any experiments or practical activities then you will need to put together a risk assessment. To do this you will need to: 1. Find out if any of the substances , equipment or procedures you plan to use are hazardous 2. Assess the risk to yourself and others (which means what could go wrong and how serious that could be, low medium or high) 3. Decide what you need to do to reduce that risk e.g. wearing goggles or other protective equipment and knowing how to deal with any potential accidents You will need to show your risk assessment to your teacher and get his/her approval before doing any practical activities. Remember! Judges will be looking for projects that demonstrate good communication skills, show innovation and creativity and that address a real-world problem. Use the Student Profile form to help structure your project www.crestawards.org

Bronze level

Ten hour projects recommended for ages 11+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Bronze Awards page.


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Bronze

Silver level

Thirty hour projects recommended for ages 14+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Silver Award page.


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Silver

Gold level

Seventy hour projects recommended for ages 16+. Find out more about this level and how to gain a CREST Award on the Gold Awards page


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Gold